Frequently Asked Family Law Questions

  • Can attorney represent us both in divorce?

    In a word, no.  Your spouse's (or other parent's) attorney is honor-bound to advocate for his or her client--and that's not you. Family law cases are inherently adversarial matters, meaning that an attorney cannot represent both sides.   Read More...

  • Do you offer a free initial consultation?

    I do!  Give me a call: I try to answer questions as thoroughly as possible.  If you prefer face-to-face, I'll set up a free in-office consultation.   Read More...

  • Is my initial consultation confidential, even if I don’t retain you?

    Yes.  I'm under a duty of confidentiality--even if I'm not retained.   Read More...

  • Does it matter if I moved out before the divorce? If I do, isn't that abandonment?

    Whether and when to separate is an important decision that should be made in consultation with counsel.  Moving out of the home--especially when minor children are involved--can affect your case and how much time you ultimately get with the children. I know it's a nightmare to live together when you're fighting, and I can usually take steps to get parties separated, but the separation should be managed to protect your rights.   Read More...

  • How much does a divorce cost?

    The cost of a family law case depends on the complexity of the case. Uncontested cases are quicker and demand less attorney time, so they're cheaper, obviously. Hard-fought cases take longer, involve more attorney time, and are more expensive. It's hard to say how much your case is likely to cost without some idea about whether your case will be contested. If you contact me for a free divorce consultation, I can get a feeling for the issues in your case and quote you a retainer...  Read More...

  • Does it matter who files for divorce first?

    In a word, yes. The plaintiff (the party filing the case) works on his or her own timeline, at his or her own leisure. The defendant (the party responding to plaintiff's filing) has strict deadlines to follow. In some situations, defendants have as few as 14 days after getting served to hire an attorney ...   Read More...

  • How long does it take to get a divorce?

    This depends on the type of case, on the judge, and on whether there're children involved.  There's a 60-day waiting period for divorces in Michigan. There's also a 6-month waiting period for divorces with children.   Read More...

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